By: Edward Egros

Jul 2016

Is Jordan Spieth Struggling?

IMG_3376Even before winning two majors—and nearly two more—in 2015, Jordan Spieth was one of the more popular golfers on the PGA Tour. Then, that popularity soared when the 22-year-old set many records beginning with the phrase: "Youngest golfer to…". But with enormous popularity and early success come high expectations. This year, Spieth has not won a major, only being in contention once out of three times. He also fell out of the top spot in the Official World Golf Rankings and has three fewer victories overall. Given what he did accomplish and how he's performing now, is Jordan Spieth Struggling?

Spieth defended his record and, during his performance at The Open at Royal Troon Golf Club, felt any questions about struggling was "unfair". Per
golflink.com:

"It's been tough given I think [2016 has] been a solid year," said Spieth. "I think if last year had not happened I'd be having a lot of positive questions and instead most of the questions I get are comparing to last year and therefore negative because it's not to the same standard…So that's almost tough to then convince myself you're having a good year when nobody else really…even if you guys think it is, the questions I get make me feel like it's not. So I think that's a bit unfair to me…"

Let's take an analytical look at if Jordan Spieth is struggling by his standards and, if so, by how much. The simplest way is to look at
Strokes Gained rankings and compare last year to this year. What makes Strokes Gained so useful is pointing specifically to the parts of the game a golfer may or may not be excelling at. The following statistics compare how well Spieth has done compared with the rest of the field:

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The numbers above the bars are his rankings on Tour. What also matters here are the following equations:

Off-the-Tee + Approach-the-Green + Around-the-Green = Tee-to-Green

Off-the-Tee + Approach-the-Green + Around-the-Green + Putting = Total

First, Spieth is actually performing better off the tee, but the rest of the field has caught up. Around the green and putting have remained steady or actually improved. The glaring statistic is his approach to the green. This measures all approach shots on par-4 and par-5 holes that are NOT within 30 yards from the edge of the green and includes tee shots on par-3 holes. Spieth has gone from .618 to -.016 (moving from 11th place to 118th). This statistic is further highlighted by looking at the breakdown of his rankings compared with the rest of the field:

  • 163rd in Greens in Regulation Percentage (62.3%)
  • T107th in Approaches from 75-100 yards (17' 10")
  • T109th in Approaches from 100-125 yards (20' 5")
  • T118th in Approaches from 125-150 yards (23' 9")

This information explains the discrepancy in SG: Tee-to-Green and SG: Total. It also explains the bigger discrepancy in tee-to-green versus total, because his skill at putting is included in the total, not tee-to-green. It is also worth noting, Spieth is playing in fewer tournaments this year than last. He played in 25 last season and is only through 16 this season, prior to the PGA Championship.

Let's now look solely at majors and highlight the discrepancy in Spieth's approach game:

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Spieth does not have the same driving accuracy, greens in regulation numbers or sand save percentage that he did in that record-breaking year.

Here is something else to consider. Perhaps one of Spieth's strengths is adapting to links courses. PGA Tour players do not play a lot on these types of courses, and while other golfers can drive the ball farther, this skill is not an advantage on a links course. But Spieth's skills as a putter and around the green do come in handy. In 2015, the U.S. Open was on a links course. Spieth won. This year, the only two domestic tournaments that even come close to those types of conditions are the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am and the Hyundai Tournament of Champions. Spieth won the latter.

What Spieth said about his game and his year requires clarification. Strokes gained statistics have helped us highlight two important things about Jordan Spieth. First, his approach game has let him down much more so than last year. Second, he is not struggling with any other part of his game and in some ways he has improved. While his fans hope Spieth would have won more tournaments this year, he still has virtually as good a chance as any to capture the final major of the season.

Who Do You Trust in the 4th Quarter?

Pasted GraphicSince being named the starting quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys, Tony Romo has been in the NFL spotlight for ten seasons and 127 games. While he has put up some of the more prolific statistics of any quarterback during this time, many argue he is the most scrutinized veteran gunslinger in the 21st century. One reason is anti-analytical: blown opportunities to win games in the 4th quarter. While many of these games have been the most critical for his team's championship aspirations, it does bring up the bigger question of which quarterbacks have been the most reliable for winning a game in the 4th quarter.

In a later article we will apply analytics and look at what constitutes a "clutch" quarterback. But first, let's look at the raw statistics. The data features 42 quarterbacks spanning all eras of the NFL but who can be considered, at a minimum, marginally successful (e.g. Peyton Manning, Warren Moon, Roger Staubach, Colin Kaepernick, etc.). The 4th quarter variables are: comeback attempts, comeback wins, comeback rate and career blown leads by the QB's own defense.

First, here is a graph of the comeback success rates:

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Of the quarterbacks analyzed, Andrew Luck has the best 4th quarter comeback rate of anyone (63%). However, he also had the fewest attempts, so it is too soon to call him the most clutch we have ever seen. In second place is Joe Montana (56%), who many might be more willing to admit is the best in close games. Peyton Manning had the most attempts of anyone (94), but his rate is 47%.

Then comes the aforementioned Tony Romo. His rate matches is only slightly worse than Manning's. While it is below half, only five of the 42 quarterbacks studied finished better than 50%. In fact, Romo's rate is 11th best out of 42. At the other end, the worst rate among active quarterbacks belongs to Aaron Rodgers (27%). Don Meredith has the lowest success rate of anyone at 25%.

Some of these rates can be explained by analyzing blown leads by that quarterback's defense:


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The quarterback dealt the least clutch defense is Drew Brees, where on 31 occasions, his "D" has blown a 4th quarter lead. Fran Tarkenton ranks second with 27. Tony Romo is tied for 10th with 17. This mark is slightly above the average among the 42 quarterback studied. As for those who have fewer reasons to be upset with their defense, there is Kurt Warner (6) and, as expected, Andrew Luck (2).

Visually and expectedly, there is already a direct correlation between 4th quarter comeback rates and blown leads by defense. Still, it is worth discovering if there are statistics for each quarterback that can help explain why some successful quarterbacks are better than others at the end of football games. I will report my findings in a future article.

Special thanks to Mark Lane for putting this data together. You can follow him on Twitter
@therealmarklane.

An Upgrade to Inside Sports Analytics

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This week we made some tweaks to the website. Some of them are literally tweaks, like adding my Instagram photos to the sidebar of the "Photo Album" pages (it's edwardegrosfox4 if you would like to follow me). My LinkedIn page is also available in the sidebar of the "About" page.

But the most exciting addition is the "
Journalism" page. Occasionally I submit sports analytic reports for Fox 4 in Dallas, the TV station for which I am the Weekend Sports Anchor. These stories are available on our station's YouTube page, and now, on this website. These stories focus on athletes and teams in north Texas but it can include major events and tournaments; it also uses the same quantitative tools the blog and podcast does.

As always if you would like to offer feedback or ask questions, please contact me through social media or by using the "
Contact Edward" page.