By: Edward Egros

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Which Golfers Dominate Where

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Jordan Spieth was bound to win the plaid jacket at Colonial Country Club. In the three previous times he played the Dean & Deluca Invitational, he finished in the top 15 every time, including a second-place finish in 2015. Spieth mentioned how much the win meant to him because it was a course and tournament he grew up attending.

Outside of Tiger Woods’ heyday, there often seems to be some randomness at the top of the leaderboard of any event. However, like with Spieth at Colonial, some golfers dominate specific courses and tournaments because they simply know it better.

I looked at 15 of the more lucrative tournaments in the world and analyzed how the top 25 in the Official World Golf Ranking faired at each one for their entire careers (I will analyze 46-year-old Phil Mickelson later because he has played much longer than everyone else in the group). Using a top ten finish as the qualification for success, here are six of the more current dominant performances:

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By this ranking, the most current dominant performance at particular course belongs to Dustin Johnson when he plays at the Genesis Open (at Riviera). Out of ten appearances, he’s had a top ten finish seven times (and won it outright this year).

What should also stand out is how frequently Rory McIlroy appears on this chart. He has become one of more successful golfers in the world by consistently performing well at specific tournaments, including the Wells Fargo Championship, the WGC-HSBC Champions and the PGA Championship. He has also had a high rate of top ten’s at the U.S. Open, WGC-Dell Match Play and Bridgestone Invitational.

It is important to note this chart groups tournaments together, not necessarily the courses. It makes Jason Day’s work at the U.S. Open perhaps more impressive, considering every top ten finish for that major has happened at a different course.

As for Lefty, his favorite tournament might be Wells Fargo, where he’s had top ten finishes 69% of the time. His second-most dominant is the Masters, at 63%. While much is made of his oh-so-close victories at the U.S. Open, only 38% of the time he cracks the top ten.

You may be wondering why Jordan Spieth failed to make the chart. After all, he’s finished first or second in every Masters appearance. In all of the lucrative tournaments analyzed, he has far fewer starts than most everyone else. However, at many of these events, he is on pace to be as dominant at the Masters, Tour Championship and WGC-Bridgestone Invitational, as he already is at Colonial.

(Special thanks to ShotLink for providing the data)